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How to Prepare for a Keynote Speech

Washington, DC, September 29, 2008 — Close up of microphones at the podium at the FEMA press breifing room before a press event. FEMA/Bill Koplitz

The primary objective of making a keynote speech is to captivate and influence your listeners. To do so, the speech must be highly persuasive and successfully inspire the audience to take swift action. No matter where you are speaking or what you are speaking about, there are a few fundamental components that are instrumental in preparing to give a keynote speech. Refer to the following guidelines in hopes of delivering a compelling and eloquent keynote speech.

 

Remain in Sync With Your Goal

Maintaining the attention of an audience depends on you pacing and your ability to align with the purpose of your speech. Make your purpose clear and the chances are you won’t need a teleprompter or notecards.

 

Be Passionate

Speaking isn’t only about providing people with information. People attend a keynote speech because they want someone to move them. Tap into this desire and never hesitate to display your passion when delivering a keynote speech.

 

Make a Connection with Listeners

Without establishing a connection to your audience, your words will be essentially meaningless. Start by respecting your audience and recognizing you are on stage to please. Establish an authentic connection using stories from the real-life experiences of your audience and relate them to your own experiences.

 

Tell Stories

Teachers have used stories as a means of communication since the beginning of human history. To this day, storytelling remains the most efficient method of presenting meaning in a truly unforgettable way, and a compelling story is a key element of a successful keynote. Use stories relevant to your own experiences or look for current topics in books or the newspapers. If you want to make your speech memorable, pick an original story rather than an overused one. Avoid repetition to keep your credibility in front of your audience.

 

Be Confident

Maintaining your composure and confidence is vital to ensuring an audience’s attention. Individuals who demonstrate confident vibes draw people to them, so be sure you walk out on the stage feeling great about yourself. If you are prone to stage fright, take time to address what is hindering you before it’s time to make your speech.

 

Use Visuals

Visual aids can be excellent when you use them optimally. Incorporate relevant pictures or videos into your keynote speech when appropriate. These visuals can serve as a means of grasping audience attention and of inciting their imagination.

 

Utilize Humor

Display humor in keynote speeches through powerful stories, particularly within the dialogue. Insert humorous lines within your stories to add some comedy to your speech. A major advantage of placing humor inside dialogue is it that even if listeners don’t get the joke or miss the humor, they will still grasp the nature of your story. This reduces the risks associated with making a direct joke and failing.

 

Express Your Own Inner Dialogue

Sharing your inner dialogue with the audience is a great way to establish a firm connection and insert humor into your speech. Since your inner dialogue is usually personal, sharing its contents in front of a big audience allows listeners to realize your honesty and authenticity, which can help secure a connection and increase audience engagement. Adding excerpts from your internal dialogue is also an excellent opportunity to add some comedy to the speech. Hearing someone’s internal thoughts can be a funny experience, so try making your thoughts both funny and truthful to make give listeners inset into your personality and make your speech truly memorable.

Leading by Influence: Are You Ready?

With the right amount of influence, an individual can compel others to join a cause, dedicate themselves to a goal, and successfully fulfill a unified vision. Contrary to popular belief, an authentic leader does not have to maintain a position of power. Whether you are a manager or employee, you have the capacity to become a leader if you put effort into it.

A highly influential person is generally one who uses leadership traits and skills such as effective communication, dependability, and the strength of influence to lead others while on the job. In many cases, employees will follow a leader’s example with no regard to what position they hold. Leading by influence can have an exceptional effect on your business’s prosperity. If you are ready to embrace leading by the power of influence, here are some ways you can become a model for leadership in the workplace regardless of your title.

 

Contribute

If you are a director or manager of a region in a business, take the time to do some of the duties your employees would normally do. Since people don’t like it when the person giving them orders hasn’t demonstrated his or her ability to contribute, a director who is eager to be hands-on will help encourage employees to be proactive as well.

 

Remain Positive

Even though no one can be positive 100% of the time, it is important to try to remain upbeat no matter what the circumstances. Positivity can be contentious, and employees are far more likely to respond positively to someone who is kind and demonstrates an ability to maintain a good attitude. Express gratitude toward others by making them feel good about their achievements and rewarding them for making progress toward their goals.

 

Have an Open-Door Policy

If your employees or associates are uneasy when approaching you, they will have less respect for you as their leader. Make sure your associates know you are accessible at any times and are willing to address any concerns they have. Being approachable helps cultivate a strong sense of mutual respect and understanding between you and your employees.

 

Be Consistent

If you tell your employees something and don’t follow through or do the exact opposite, you will damage your integrity. Losing credibility with your employees is extremely hard to come back from, so once you commit to do something, always honor it.

 

Communicate

As a force of inspiration, effective communication  helps guide others in pursuit of achievement, so it is essential to be an excellent communicator in order to lead by influence. Enhancing communication skills will enable you to use your inspirational power to motivate others so keep the following notions in mind when expressing ideas to employees and associates:

  • Understand what you want to achieve.
  • Consider the perspective of your listeners.
  • Pay close attention to how they respond.

 

Use Rewards

Being in a position of power allows leaders to use rewards to motivate others, but outstanding leaders can recreate the notion of coercive power by transforming it into influence no matter what their position is. Handing out rewards, including bonuses and promotions, in accordance with a clearly expressed batch of criteria helps promote productive activity. Maintaining a rewards system also includes adhering to rules and being fair always, which will increase your credibility and establish a foundation of trust between you and your employees.

 

Be an Example

The referent influences you have, the more others will want to align themselves with your cause.

You can increase your referent influence by being ethical, reliable, and embodying the qualities of professionalism. Illuminate the values of honesty, fairness, respect, and company pride to establish a strong model for others to look up to.

I removed the link here to the influence training page and instead placed it under “leading by influence” as that anchor text is more relevant to the link.

The 10 Most Famous Motivational Speakers

A truly outstanding motivational speaker never fails to inspire his or her audience members with gravitating and compelling speeches. While there are many good motivational speakers in the world, there are only a few who truly stand out from the crowd. These few captivating speakers can seize the attention of crowds to help get their messages across. Here is a list of the top 10 most famous motivational speakers who have demonstrated their capacities to make an impact on millions of lives throughout the world. Each of these speakers has the uncanny ability to get his or her message across in a way that is impactful

 

1. Eric Thomas

Eric Thomas not only dropped out of high school, he was homeless as well. Nowadays, he is one of the most passionate motivational speakers known. Using his personal experiences to provide guidance to others, widely regarded as blunt advice, but highly credible and truthful. He refrains from delivering sugar-coated speeches and highlights the fact that each person has a different definition of success. But no matter what it may be, he tells audiences that success can take many years to achieve. He stresses the importance of being willing to sacrifice and sustaining true dedication to achieve success in the future.

 

2. Tony Robbins

At 6 feet 7 inches tall, Tony Robbins has a demanding stage presence, which allows him to grasp the attention of his audience with ease. As an individual who genuinely enjoys helping others achieve their goals and make the most out of their lives, he speaks to listeners with vigor and passion. While many inspirational speakers lack depth, Tony understands the psychology of achievement. He tells audiences that people who create spectacular results take specific steps to establish themselves. He starts his speeches with the fundamentals, including what you want to do with your life and why this goal is important to you. He proceeds to go more in-depth about strategies and ideas to assist you in persevering on behalf of your dreams.

 

3. Nick Vujicic

Nick Vujicic was born without any arms or legs, but he never let his condition hinder his ability to seek fulfillment and achieve success in his life. With gratitude and compassion for others, he is an incredibly happy man who speaks about the significance of remaining strong and never giving up on yourself. He believes nothing is truly impossible, and the word “quitting” is not a part of his vocabulary. He emphasizes the importance of not concentrating on what you can’t do in life. Rather, he advises people to concentrate on what you can control and what you can do to move forward.

 

4. Naseer Khan

As one of the most highly regarded motivational speakers in India, Naseer Khan believes that to achieve, you must believe in yourself. Working as a door-to-door salesperson until he was 18, Naseer lived a humble life as one of nine children in his family. Nowadays, Naseer focuses on inspiring others to exceed objectives through corporate training techniques including employee motivation, confidence building, power selling, and many more.

 

5. Zig Ziglar

Zig Ziglar is an author and inspirational speaker whose words have the influential power necessary to transcend time. He has been traveling the world since the 1970s, speaking out for positive progression to foster enthusiasm for change. He specializes in personal development training and coaches many individuals in topics including sales, presentation skills, and more.

 

6. Jim Rohn

Known for his moving speeches that stimulate the mind and inspire the soul, John Robin has helped thousands accomplish their goals. His legacy continues to impact the lives of many individuals worldwide in their endeavors to establish meaningful goals and pursue personal development.

 

7. Iyanla Vanzant

Once a welfare mother, Iyanla Vanzant is now an Emmy award-winning, New York Times best-selling author, and one of America’s most adored motivational speakers. With a straightforward approach, Iyanla uses her energy, passion, wit, and sense of humor to deliver a message focused on using love, acceptance, and perseverance to live your ideal life.

 

8. Vikas Jain

Vikas Jain is an author and worldwide motivational speaker known for his exceptional keynote speeches. Specializing in developing motivational sales training, he has created unique employee training programs on a variety of topics including leadership, team building, youth motivation, entrepreneurship, and more.

 

9. Robin Sharma

Robin Sharma is one of the most world-renowned motivational speakers on business leadership. As a best-selling author of several books, he travels the world to give moving keynote speeches at companies and organizations committed to developing dedicated leaders.

 

10. John Assaraf

John Assaraf has spent the last 25 years on a quest to achieve his goal of helping others understand their capacity to utilize their innate talents to live their best lives. As a student of human consciousness and behavior, he holds the belief that everyone can use cognitive tools to retrain the brain to concentrate on specific motivating principles.

Years of Negotiations Finally Allow Facebook to Creep into Music

Facebook has been working for years to gain its share of the music industry. Music on the social media site is extremely popular, garnering the most shares of any subject on the site. The problem with that popularity is that music posts and videos link users straight to YouTube, Facebook’s biggest rival. With more than two billion registered users, Facebook could make a tremendous impact on streaming music, and many expect the social media giant to release a Facebook music streaming service in the very near future.

Recent Facebook Licensing Deals

In February of 2018, Facebook closed negotiations with ICE, a European online rights hub. ICE remarked that the deal was of “landmark” significance as it is the first music licensing partnership for the social media giant. The deal covers 290,000 rights holders in 160 territories and allows Facebook to license these properties on Facebook, Messenger, Instagram, and Oculus.

The ICE deal follows several deals Facebook has previously completed with record labels and publishing agencies. In December of 2017, Facebook signed a multi-year licensing deal with Universal Music Group and a separate licensing agreement with Sony. Facebook also has licensing agreements with Global Music Rights, HFA/Rumblefish, and Kobalt Music Publishing. While these deals indicate Facebook is heavily investing in music streaming on their existing applications and will likely want to start producing more original content, many speculate that these deals are signs of a Facebook music-streaming service in the works.

Why Make These Moves Now?

The streaming music market value could hit $14 billion by 2030, and Facebook is likely gearing up to be a competitive force in this quickly growing market. Currently, major music streaming services like Spotify, Pandora, and Google Play Music have vastly more free subscribers than paying subscribers, and converting free users to paying users seems to be a hurdle for every music-based streaming service. However, Facebook may have an advantage due to its already staggeringly large user base. If even a small fraction of Facebook users convert to a paid music streaming service it could disrupt the music streaming service industry tremendously.

Negotiations between Facebook and various rights holders, publishing agencies, and record labels have lasted for several years at this point, and deals of this magnitude take time to close. Facebook needs to build an extremely competitive offering of streaming music to make a dent in the existing industry and encourage users to convert to paid subscriptions, but if they pull it off it could restructure the entire music streaming industry.

4 Tips for Answering Influence Skills Questions in Interviews

We’ve all been on that interview where a prospective employer asks you to “Give me an example of a time when…” While building rapport is very important in the interview process, it often feels as though the interviewer is just reading off a list of prepared questions. Well, he or she most likely is.

But what does the prospective employer really want to know?

These questions, also known as competency-based or behavioral interview questions, are designed to discover how you may respond in real-world situations. They’re useful for helping hiring managers weed out applicants who look good on paper from the ones who understand how to influence others and deliver the results that they need.

In almost every field, from government to project management to customer service, these negotiation and influencing skills can have a strong impact on a worker’s success. Negotiation interview questions allow prospective employees to demonstrate where these negotiation and influencing skills have helped them in the past—situations that may not show up in the applicant’s cover letter or résumé.

Some examples of influence skills questions are:
  • Tell us about a major challenge you encountered in your current position. How did you adapt and overcome?
  • How do you handle projects that require a lot of initiative and team work?
  • What is your approach to dealing with an angry customer? Can you tell us about a specific time when you solved this type of situation?
  • How do you contribute to your organization’s long- and short-term goals?

Even though these types of negotiation interview questions style of interviewing have become increasingly popular, questions like these can still throw you for a loop. SNI offers a variety of courses to help develop the communication skills necessary to excel in situations like these, but we’ll start with the basics. Here are four tips for answering these influence skills questions that will help ensure you project competence and authority, highlighting your value from the moment you enter the room.

Reach for the STAR

The challenge with influence skills questions usually isn’t thinking of an example; it’s organizing your thoughts efficiently and communicating them powerfully. The STAR acronym outlines four steps to breaking down an influence skills question – no matter how complex it may seem. Keep this in mind when a hiring manager lobs one your way.

1. Situation. Describe the situation or context of the example. For instance, “We were far behind our projected sales goals and had lost two key members of our team.”

2. Task. What goal were you trying to meet? What obstacles were you trying to overcome? “We had three weeks to make up 50% of the difference.

3. Action you took. Take ownership and use “I” statements frequently. Remember, they are interviewing you – not your former coworkers. “I pulled some long hours running numbers and I discovered missed opportunities…” Also, specifics are crucial here. Try to use actual facts and figures instead of generalizations. “I analyzed three months of account revenue and found 30–40 instances of missed opportunities.”

4. Results. Again, using “I” statements and specific facts, sum it all up. Example: “I restructured the working hours of the staff to allow for more coverage during high-volume times, resulting in a 35% increase in our closing rate and an additional $500,000 in revenue. My department ended up exceeding our goal by $10,000–$15,000.”

Follow STAR and the other tips outlined above. The next time an interviewer tries to surprise you with an influence skills question, you’ll be more than prepared to demonstrate your strengths when it comes to getting results.

Dominate the Conversation in Your Industry

ConverstaionAs a professional who has spent many years in your industry, you have the expertise to spot trends and potential problems. But how do you get your voice heard? By positioning yourself to sway the conversation in your industry, you can be a force of change and create credibility that increases sales as well. Follow the three steps below to become an influencer in your industry.

Focus on Your Niche

Unless you are Leonardo da Vinci, it is likely that your expertise is strongest in a particular niche. To be the authority on a subject, you need to devote your focus to one area that you are highly knowledgeable about. This means committing to staying current in your area of expertise as well as having the knowledge and foresight to analyze trends and anticipate where things are heading in the future. Broaden that niche too much, and you lose the ability to speak authoritatively on a subject in a way that makes your voice one that is listened to.

Make Time for Social Media

You probably are not going to be asked to be an expert panelist on CNN today. On social media, however, you already have an audience. For those serious about becoming an influencer in their area of expertise, social media isn’t a nuisance or waste of time. On the contrary, it is one of the first channels available to get your voice heard. Regularly plan time for creating concise and well-written statements for social media that highlight your expertise on a subject. This might involve a short daily block of time when you create a single post or two or a longer block on one day of the week where you create several posts that you schedule to release over the course of a week.

Book Seminars

As you begin to gain attention for your area of expertise, it pays to move beyond the screen to speaking to people face to face. Booking a seminar to educate people in your chosen field of interest can set you apart as someone worth listening to. Make time to attend seminars as well. This provides you with opportunities to network with others interested in your area of expertise as well as providing an opportunity to learn from others in your field.

Let your passion for your niche shine through and be a force of change for good. The benefits will not only be reflected in sales, but also in helping shape the future of your industry.

Learning to Make an Impact at Work and in Life

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Everyone wants to be able to have an impact—to know that the things that they’re doing really matter. There’s a drive to influence our circumstances and the people around us. While the ability to influence others doesn’t come naturally to everyone, however, it’s certainly a skill that can be learned.

At SNI, we offer comprehensive influence training, teaching our clients how to work with and influence others by helping them to understand the people with whom they’re working. Our clients often call these types of courses we offer “impact training” as they are all about how to make an impact on others. The content we cover is more than we can lay out in a single blog post, but we’d like to introduce you to a few of the core elements. To get the full benefit, take a look at our influence training program.

Ancient Strategies Adapted to a Modern Environment

Whether you’re talking about influence training for salespeople or any other of our impact training programs to help in general interactions, it all goes back thousands of years to Aristotle. The ancient philosopher taught about three elements to influence: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos—credibility, emotion, and logic, respectively. What that means is that in order to influence someone, you need to convince them that you know what you’re talking about, then appeal to both their hearts and their minds. Even now, thousands of years later, Aristotle’s philosophies hold true.

Show What You Know

In order to persuade someone of anything, you first must convince them that you’re worth listening to. Essentially, you have to demonstrate your credibility to them. While the heart of this is proving your knowledge of the subject you are discussing—whether that is a product or service you offer or a policy you are hoping to influence—it goes beyond that. You must also convince them that you have a full understanding of the situation from all perspectives, particularly that of the other person. They need to feel that you have their best interest in mind. If you can’t show that you see where they are coming from, it will be difficult to have any effect on them.

In order to build credibility, you need to listen closely to what the other party is saying. If you are working on a sales floor, chances are the other person has come to you with some need they are hoping to fill. Ask them questions to figure out what that need is, then actively address it. To truly demonstrate your understanding, listening is at least as important as talking, so pay attention.

Forging a Connection

Although some people claim to remain detached during any negotiation, there is an emotional component to any negotiation. That’s why one of the core skills you will find as part of any impact training is the ability to forge a connection with someone else. As you demonstrate an understanding of your audience, you can establish common ground and use language that they will respond to. Some words are charged with particular emotions, and as you learn more about your audience, you can use those words to evoke an emotional response.

Quick Tip on Forging Relationships: Next time you have a conversation with someone listen to which sense they tend to use the most – do they say “I heard this…”, “I felt like…”, I keep seeing…”, “I could smell…”, or “I could taste…”? People tend to use one sense more than others, if you mirror (mimic the other side – in this case, focus on that describing an experience with that same sense) you will find that the other party is more receptive, which in turn can help develop a connection.

Walk Them Through the Steps

Once you’ve established your credibility and made a connection with someone, you’ve earned some degree of trust. This means that they are more likely to pay attention to your logical appeal. Careful not to be condescending, you should lay out each point, citing facts, statistics, and other evidence to back up what you are saying. During your logical appeal, don’t embellish with flowery language; simply lay out each point, leading them to your conclusion. End with a specific call to action to give your audience a purpose on which they can act.

Lead—Don’t Push

When you are trying to influence someone, whether to agree to a proposal or to make a purchase, it’s important not to push. The instant someone feels as though you are trying to push them in a specific direction, the natural response is to resist. In the end, even if you’re able to convince them, it will likely leave a sour taste in their mouth, which can cause distrust down the road. Someone once said that the definition of the word “diplomacy” is “the ability to let someone else get your way.” At SNI, that is what we teach, but we do it in a way that focuses on finding solutions that benefit you, while ensuring that others are satisfied in the process.

How to Use Psychological Theories to Increase Conversions

Though it’s not the first thing that might come to mind, psychology and sales techniques often go hand in hand. Effective salespeople know how to speak their customer’s language to build rapport and connect to what motivates them, and, for them to do that, they must understand the basics of what drives people to do what they do. Here are strategies to convince customers what you’re offering is in their best interests using the tenets of psychology.

Priming

In psychology, priming means offering a stimulus that influences someone’s future actions or thoughts – even when the stimulus seems unconnected from that action. When you prime a prospective client, you introduce something new or resurface older ideas from the subconscious. That way, what you’ve introduced is more accessible to that person’s mind. To use this technique, know that it comes with an expiration date. The thoughts you are priming them to keep at the front of their minds tend to recess into their subconscious, so primed ideas have about a 24-hour life cycle.

The pitfall to priming is when a salesperson is too obvious. For instance, if you’re selling grills, don’t ask how a client likes their meat cooked. Instead, ask questions about family get-togethers or holidays often celebrated outdoors, like the Fourth of July. The client’s mind will connect the dots between grills and family functions – without the salesperson having to do a hard sell.

Scarcity

The psychological response to scarcity is obvious any time there’s an impending natural disaster – grocery shelves stocked with water and bread suddenly become empty. In these situations, people often take much more than they need to survive the hurricane or tornado. But, since they are concerned about these items becoming scarce – even though it’s unlikely – they still over-purchase.

In sales, you can use this to your advantage. If prospects think a solution is in short supply, they’re motivated to act before they miss out. When something is rare, its perceived value goes up. Use these two types of scarcities to increase sales:

  • Time-related scarcity – Prospects must commit by a specific date or they will miss a rare-opportunity.
  • Quantity-related scarcity – There are only so many items currently available at a certain price, and, unless they purchase now, they won’t be able to purchase them again.
Specificity

The human mind is created to consider details, and, the more precise a description is, the more likely it is to be perceived as trustworthy. According to this tenet of psychology, arguments become more believable by being precise. Numbers may seem easier to retain when they’re approximate, but giving precise amounts increases your credibility. For example, saying your solution more than doubled productivity is not as effective as saying it increased productivity by 57 percent.

Precise details reinforce your authority and show your attention to detail, which the mind perceives as more trustworthy.

Social Influence

People are strongly influenced both by what others are doing and by how they view their relationship with the influencer, which makes social media such a goldmine for some industries.

To leverage this kind of influence, use information you already have to inject elements of social proof into your persuasive technique. Let prospects know how many people have used your product or services. Link them to positive feedback and case studies that show your organization’s strength. Find the people who interact most with your brand and use common characteristics to drive sales.

Getting people through the sales funnel takes time, in part because of how the mind works. When you are considering how to drive conversions, dust off your Psy 101 textbook – you may be surprised how much it will help you win a sale.

 

SNI’s Jeff Cochran Scores Highest Feedback at 2017 SAMA Conference

Strategic Account Management Association, Inc. (SAMA) gathers talent in strategic and key account management from around the globe every year at their annual conferences, one in North America and another in Europe. At this year’s North American conference, SNI’s own Jeff Cochran presented the “The Power of Nice: Maximizing Your Most Crucial Negotiations”.  Jeff showcased SNI’s philosophy on how you can maximize your share while still maintaining a long-term relationship with the other side.

His ability to captivate and provide value to his audience was shown in his post evaluation scores and anonymous participants’ comments. Two examples are:

  • “Best session I attended during the conference.”
  • “Appreciated the handouts to use for note taking. Jeff did a super job of keeping everyone engaged, especially considering it was the last session of the day.”

Here is a summary of scores that made him the #1 ranked speaker at the conference:

SAMA Report Card

SAMA Report Card

How Aristotle Invented Influence Training

While we may think the basics of public speaking starting recently, it was actually 2,300 years ago that Aristotle recorded his theory on effective public speaking. He espoused the importance of ethos (credibility), pathos (emotion), and logos (logic) to influence behavior. His principles are still the key foundation for negotiations training. Here’s how Aristotle’s tenets have shaped the art of argument and influence in business today.

Ethos – The Speaker’s Character

To persuade anyone of anything, you must appear credible. Regardless of what you wear, how solid your company is, or even how your reputation may precede you, if your listener has reason to question your credibility, your negotiations will suffer. Aristotle says a credible speaker conveys three qualities:

  • Competence – The knowledge and ability to do what you say you can do.
  • Good Intention – You intend to do good for your listener.
  • Empathy – The listener feels as if you have been in their shoes.

Ethos is both articulated and nonverbal. Your demeanor, body language, and tone all play a role in your perceived credibility. It’s about your audience’s perception of you and your ability to control that perception. To improve ethos, develop expertise in the subject you’re going to be speaking about. Learning more and growing more comfortable in the subject matter will allow you to speak confidently and convey knowledgeable insight.

Pathos – The Speaker’s Emotional Influence

If your goal is to persuade, you must make an emotional connection. Aristotle said if people feel anger, the speaker should discover with whom they are angry and why. The first step in doing this is to have a basic knowledge of your audience. What are their values and beliefs? Use techniques that appeal to their emotions and offer something they desire.

Choose presentation techniques with which your audience can identify. Use humor to get them laughing with you. Tell a story to draw them in and help them make personal connections. Use words that are charged with the emotion you seek to convey. Offer carefully chosen visuals so your audience sees what you have seen.

Logos – The Speaker’s Appeal to Reason

Only after you have established credibility and made an emotional connection, should you proceed with your logical statement. This step is as important as the other two, but, without ethos and pathos, logos will fail.

Evaluate your message to be sure it makes sense. Use plain language that everyone in your audience can understand. Repeat key ideas so they stand out. Present facts, statistics, and evidence to back up what you’re saying. Give your audience a clear call to action so they know what to do with what they’ve experienced.

Keep ethos, pathos, and logos in your mind the next time you come to the negotiation table.