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October 23, 2014

5 of the Top Negotiation Tactics

Business

Jeff Cochran

3

It’s not easy to become a top negotiator. It requires instruction and practice to become truly adept. Negotiations Training from experts in the field is a great catalyst for success in your career. However, there are certain negotiation tactics that enable people to succeed in the tensest negotiations, even with inadequate negotiation training. Read on to learn a few key methods for success.

  1. Know when to make the first offer. In most negotiations, you do not want to be the person making the first offer. Letting the other side set the starting point will give you an idea of what their goal might be and will usually give you the upper hand. However, there are some cases in which you might want to move first; the trick is to recognize those rare cases when they arise. This is where negotiations training from Shapiro Negotiations can make the difference between success and a failure to close the deal.
  1. Provide reasonable counter offers. Most people have seen how negotiations go in movies: two people both shouting unreasonable numbers at one another until they somehow come to an agreement, or else the situation devolves into violence. In actual negotiations, countering with unreasonable offers will rarely help improve your hand.
  1. Be prepared for aggressive tactics. Some negotiators rely on hyperaggressive tactics, hoping to intimidate their counterparts to win the negotiation. Be prepared for insults, backhanded comments, and attempts to get underneath your skin. While these strategies are immature, you will likely come across them a few times in your career.
  1. Ask questions. Learn about the people sitting across the table from you. If they are pushing back against what seems to be a mutually beneficial agreement, ask why. This will give you an insight into their motives and goals and will open the communication lines between you and your opponent, hopefully leading to a fruitful conclusion.
  1. Come prepared. Research your opponent’s company to find out what its background is, how it has grown, what its goals are, and how it stands to benefit from your negotiation. If possible, research your fellow negotiator, as well, to learn his or her tactics, demeanor, and character. The more information you have, the better the outcome will be for your company.
COMMENTS (3)
  • #2 is especially insightful. When people bring unreasonable offers it is disrespectful and can drive a wedge between both sides.

  • # 2 holds true. Unreasonable offers and counteroffers can sour negotiations quickly.

  • I agree with you Steve, nothing worse than being insulted with a bad offer. Preparation is key, the more information you have upfront the better negotiator you will be.

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