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3 Ways to Warm Up Cold Leads in 2017

Cold calling and cold lead marketing still have their place, even in today’s technology driven world, but, with the digital revolution, there are some new tricks to the trade. We live in a consumer-driven economy, so they’re more ahead of the curve than they used to be. Cold lead marketing is now a combination of digital and traditional techniques, but it has the same end goal: leading a prospect one step further down the funnel. Here’s how to do it in 2017:

1.  Foresee and Derail Common Objections

Rejection is simply a part of the business, and most cold callers know how quickly rejection can derail a call, but doing some customer research can help you identify sources of common objections so you can tackle them before they arise.

Each company will handle an objection differently, but, no matter your response, practice it over and over. For example, a common objection is that a product or service is cost-prohibitive. Be prepared to offer alternate solutions, such as an exclusive promotion, instead of hanging up the phone.

2.   Leverage Multiple Channels

If you’re still exclusively cold-calling, it’s time to come to the 21st century. The digital revolution has opened up several channels for cold lead marketing: email campaigns, social media outlets, and even things like Adwords.

One of the best ways you can nurture a cold lead is by posting relevant evergreen content on your company blog. Evergreen content, like its name, is long-lasting and sustainable. It’s not breaking news or information about the latest trends, so it remains relevant for long past its publication date. This allows traffic to build over time.

To build evergreen content for your website, consider your customers best pain points and design your work around it. These are ideas that will stand the test of time and that you can share through different channels over time (email marketing, social media, etc).

3.  Prepare With Email

Cold calling can be a valuable tool in your sales arsenal, but you can warm up a cold call by sending a quick email. Create a compelling, personalized subject line, then offer a paragraph of content that addresses a customer’s pain point or business concern. Tell them you plan to call to discuss the issue further. Avoid being too “salesy” since you’re not really selling them anything at this point. Focus on providing them with VALUE at this point.

Cold lead marketing has become more sophisticated than ever thanks to today’s technology. Follow these tips to turn cold leads into loyal customers.

How to Prepare for Sales Training

Sales training is a crucial step toward increasing your sales performance, becoming an effective negotiator, improving your skills of persuasion, and fostering strong interpersonal relationships. On the other hand, if you’re not adequately prepared for your sales training seminar, you may not get the most out of the valuable information you learn. Here’s how to get ready for your sales training event:

Take Ownership of the Process

Some employees look at sales training as the cost of doing business, but this isn’t the right approach. To make the most of your training, start with the right mindset. This means:

  • Acknowledging that you don’t have all the answers. Everyone, even those who are posting the highest numbers every month, can learn something new. A growth mindset is essential for becoming the best salesperson you can be.
  • Talking it up. Take on a leadership role and get everyone else excited about the seminar, too. A collaborative approach will ensure you’re all getting as much out of your time and investment. When you get home from your training, work together to implement what you’ve learned.
  • Giving it your all. Don’t show up just to fill a seat. Minimize distractions by telling everyone when you’ll be gone and you won’t be responding as quickly to messages in that time frame.
  • Stepping out of your comfort zone. Most salespeople naturally enjoy talking to others, but everyone has a comfort zone. Make an effort to step out of yours by collaborating with others outside of your immediate circle and actively participating in your learning experience.
Prepare Beforehand, Not During

If possible, get an outline of the session so you can better prepare. Take a few moments to plan a learning goal for yourself. What do you hope to get out of the session? What are you expecting to learn? Once you have a plan in mind, it will be easier to ask questions and take notes to ensure you’re meeting your goals.

During the seminar, pay close attention and enjoy yourself! Training sessions are usually informative, fun, and offer plenty of opportunities for collaboration. Once you return from your sales training, don’t forget to apply it: sales skills are like muscles – if you don’t flex them often, they’ll lose their strength.

Getting the most out of your sales training is a matter of having the right mindset, showing up prepared, and using what you’ve learned. If you follow those steps, your professional life will benefit.

How to Measure the Returns of Influence Training

Many employers consider influence training for their staff but are unsure of how to measure their return on investment. Often, managers must provide metrics to the C-Suite to justify the expense of such programs. There are several ways to assess the benefits of influence training:

Take A Look At Their Actions

People may say a lot about their training experience. They may say they were engaged with the materials and they learned information, but actions speak louder than words. That’s why quantitative measures, rather than qualitative ones, are more effective in discussing further training with the C-Suite.

For example, use a simple response system like Poll Everywhere to conduct a short quiz to assess knowledge before and after a training session. This will help measure the returns on your training efforts and justify more training for your employees.

Here’s another idea: create a series of benchmarks before sending employees off for influence training. Once your employees return, list a series of scenarios to work through, and see if those benchmarks were met. This not only helps you determine who was engaged with the sessions, but it gauges the value of the sessions themselves.

Here are some other examples of assessments you can sell to management:

  • Best answer questions. A multiple-choice assessment will provide good quantitative data to give to your higher ups.
  • Peer review. Have trainees put together a product (either alone or in teams) that the rest of the workforce can review. Have them make suggestions for improvement or comment on the quality of the work.
Look at Metrics Over Time

One of the best ways to measure the return on your influence training investment is to look at quantitative trends in your business outcomes over time. Here are some examples of metrics to measure:

  • Productivity and output
  • Sales volume
  • Customer satisfaction, including retention and the number of customer complaints
  • Employee metrics, including  average length of employment and revenue per employee

Just be sure your metrics are relevant, measureable, and provide value to your stakeholders.

If you are looking to convince your employer to pay for your influence training because you feel it will have business and personal benefits, don’t forget that proving the former to management is the key. Prepare a plan to measure the returns on your training investment and follow through accordingly. You’ll find that influence training is well worth the cost.

Why You Need a Sales Training Course

The art of the sale is about more than making a pitch. A compelling salesperson has both strong communication skills and powers of interpretation. These are abilities that are suited not just to people in sales, but those in virtually every profession. Consider these reasons why sales training can benefit any industry:

It Improves Customer Communication

Every business has customers, and you’re usually trying to sell them something, whether it’s a product, service, or experience. Sales training fosters important skills like listening to understand what the customer needs and wants. You’ll learn how to ask the right questions during an interaction, guiding a prospect through the funnel and turning them into a loyal customer. An added benefit of sales training is that is enhances communication with all personality types.

Customers also have unhappy moments, despite our best intentions. A sales training course will enhance customer service skills so a worker can navigate objections and offer solutions that enhance the consumer experience.

It Develops Leadership Skills

At its core, sales is service. No matter your industry, you want to make people feel good about working with you and cultivate long-term relationships. Good leaders display strong communication skills and develop valuable interpersonal relationships with shareholders and employees alike.

A sales training course teaches leadership skills by promoting an understanding of people and delivering value to both customers and workers. Reaching the right people at the right time to solve a problem is the heart of sales.

It Helps People Overcome Hurdles

We all suffer rejection from time to time. Customers want to find a reason not to buy, or a manager might have a hard time buying into a new idea. No matter the cause, objections happen. In some cases, it’s tempting to give up after a rejection, but sales training teaches people how to get to the root of an objection and overcome it.

One of the most common ways to teach this concept is with role playing. For example, in a training course, we may have a “prospect” give objections to a salesperson during a presentation. This allows the trainee to think through and discover possible reasons for objections in a mock scenario.

Sales training benefits people in all different industries. A sales mindset is essential for delivering superior customer service, cultivating quality relationships, and resolving objections before they become a problem. Consider adding a sales training course to your job teaching repertoire.